Enter Your Classroom

In many of our classrooms today, tech is a built-in feature, taken for granted, and facility with digital tools seems as built-in as the nearly ubiquitous “smart podiums.”

In the COVID-19 pivot to remote classes, the role of technology in our teaching changed from feature to foundation. But how strong is that foundation, and what are the consequences for technophobia (and its flip-side twin, technophilia): our own, that of our students, and that of our colleagues, now? How have privilege, class, race, sexuality, and gender informed our enthusiasm or skepticism around digital tools and our pandemic-panic pivot? Who are our pedagogical selves? How have technology or institutional tech mandates changed our perception of those selves, and what has been our pedagogical relationship to technology, before and after the pivot?

This course, through reading, writing, collaboration, creation, and discussion, will explore these and related questions, and we’ll take Cathy Davidson’s call for “educators to find a way between the twin pitfalls of technophobia and technophilia so that they can wisely navigate our technology-obsessed era–and prepare our students to do the same” as a call to action, especially in our post-pivot present and future. We’ll consider the intersections of technophobia and authoritarian pedagogies, #edtech and oppression, and of critical pedagogy and our biases and personal approaches to teaching.

We’ll collaborate on pedagogies which help faculty and students avoid the pitfalls of technophobia / technophilia, respond productively to them, and develop an open resource (for sharing broadly and with our own institutions, colleagues, communities, and students) which aids in this work.